Category CABINETS. AND BOOKCASES

HARDWARE

INSTALLING A LOCK

1

Outlining the lock faceplate

Lay the chest on its front panel and position the lock face-down midway between the sides and flush with the top edge of the panel. Trace the outline of the faceplate (above), then extend the lines onto the top edge of the panel.

2

Routing the lock mortise

This is one of the rare instances in which the router is used to make a free­hand cut. Care and patience are required. Use a wood chisel to first cut a shallow mortise for the faceplate lip in the top edge of the front panel. Next, install a straight bit in your router, set the cutting depth to the thickness of the faceplate, and cut a mortise inside the marked out­line...

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BASES AND FEET

1

Marking the pin board

The feet of the blanket chest are made from two identical boards cut with a dec­orative scroll pattern and joined with half­blind dovetail joints. Make the joinery cuts first, then saw out the patterns and assem­ble the pieces. To begin, cut blanks to the size of the feet, then mark the half-blind dovetails. Indicate the outside face of each board with an X. Then adjust a cutting gauge to the thickness of the stock and scribe a line across the inside face of the pin board to mark the shoulder line. Next, secure the board end-up in a vise, set the cutting gauge to about one-third the stock’s thickness, and mark a line across the end closer to its outside face. Use a dovetail square to mark the pins on the end of the board...

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ANATOMY OF A BLANKET CHEST

Flap stay

Screwed to inside of chest side and lid; can be adjusted to suit wide range of lid weights and closing speeds. In fully open position, collar snaps into rod cap to hold lid open

Traditional blanket chests were often fur­nished with one or more drawers to store anything from papers and pens to sewing needles and thread. The top and bottom panels of the drawer assembly are mount­ed in stopped grooves in the front and back panels of the chest, with a divider to separate the opening for the drawers.

Since molding strips are fas­tened around its edges with sliding dovetails to accommo­date wood movement, the chest top shown at left does not require battens to keep it flat, though two have been added for decorative effect...

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BLANKET CHEST

The chest is one of the earliest types of furniture, with a long utilitarian tradition. During the Middle Ages, chests served as the primary receptacles of household goods and valuables. They were also called upon to perform double duty as a seating place, at a time when chairs were a luxury for most people.

Although early chest designs were primitive, medieval artisans often adorned them with carved arches and elaborate chivalric and battle scenes. During the Renais­sance and Baroque periods, the piece began to assume some of the elements that are still used today, including frame-and-panel joinery, molded tops and bases, and patterned bracket feet. Over the years, attractive hardware was added, such as brass locks, handles, and escutcheons.

In Colonial America, the chest was usually pla...

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INSTALLING A LOCK

1 Cutting the keyhole

To mark the keyhole location on the door, measure the distance between the outside edge of the lock and the center of the key chamber on the inside of the lock. (The lock being installed here is illustrat­ed on page 63.) Then transfer your mea­surement to the door, measuring from the rabbet cheek on the door’s back face. You need to drill two holes for the key: one for the shaft and a narrower one for the key bit, which is the strip of metal below the forward end of the shaft. Bore the wider hole first, using an electric drill fit­ted with a twist bit slightly larger than the key shaft. Then fit the drill with a bit slightly larger than the thickness of the key bit and bore a second hole below the shaft hole (right)-, locate the hole to suit the key...

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HANGING THE DOORS: CLOCK-CASE HINGES

1 Positioning the hinges

Set the armoire on its back. For each door, fix strips of masking tape across the corners of the opening. Place small sand­paper shims beside the pieces of tape to prevent the door from inadvertently shift­ing as you work. Set the door in place, centering it over the opening. Measure from both sides to make certain the door is parallel to the stiles. Once you are sat­isfied with the positioning, mark the cor­ners of the door on the tape with a pencil. Next, butt the hinges against the edge of the door; use a tape measure to make sure that they are equally spaced from the top and bottom of the door (right). Holding the upper half of the hinge in place, slip off the bottom half and the hinge pin and use a pencil to mark the screw holes on the door edge (below).

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CORNICE MOLDINGS

MAKING CORNICE MOLDING

1

Routing the molding

Cut three boards longer and wider than you will need for the three layers of mold­ing (above). Install a panel-raising bit in your router and mount the tool in a table. Align the bit bearing with the fence and adjust the cutter height to leave a flat lip no more than / inch thick on the edge of the stock above the molding. Mount two featherboards on the fence and one on the table to secure the stock throughout the cuts. (In this illustration, the featherboard on the outfeed fence has been removed for clarity.) Turn on the tool and feed the stock (left). To complete the pass, move to the outfeed side of the table and pull the stock through the end of the cut.

Make several passes, increasing the width of cut & inch of stock at a time...

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PILASTERS

MAKING AND INSTALLING PILASTERS

1

Cutting the grooves

Cut the pilaster pieces to size, taking into account the width of the stiles and allowing enough space between the door and the pilaster for the hinges you plan to use. Then, install a core box bit in your router and mount the tool in a table. Adjust the cutting height for a semicircular cove. Mark the location of the grooves on the end of the board and add marks on the face indicating where the cut should start and end. Align the front cutting line with the bit, then use the leading end of the piece to mark a reference line on the outfeed fence. Repeat the procedure with the back cutting line and make a similar reference line on the infeed fence...

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ARMOIRE

he armoire came into favor dur­ing the late 15th and early 16th Centuries to meet the growing need for storage space by Renaissance Europe’s wealthy and acquisitive city dwellers.

The armoire provided upright storage of fine goods; before, belongings were usually packed in large chests.

From the beginning, the armoire was as prized for its decorative attributes as for its practicality. The piece is essen­tially a freestanding closet featuring one or two doors, providing space to hang clothes, and occasionally drawers and shelving to furnish additional storage.

The design reached a pinnacle in the late 17th Century, when Parisian cabi­netmaker Andre-Charles Boulle pro­duced several for the court of Louis XIV.

Though his pieces were undeniably Baroque in their elaborate ornamenta­tion,...

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BASES AND FEET

Base molding is often added to a book­case to “anchor” the piece and com­plement any crown molding installed at the top. There are two basic ways to build a base. The first is to make a rabbeted mitered frame of molded pieces from stock standing on edge (see below); this frame wraps around the base of the bookcase like a skirt and hides the join­ery at the bottom of the carcase. The sec­ond method involves building a mitered frame of horizontal molded stock; this provides a flat surface for attaching turned feet (page 58). Both methods allow for wood expansion and can also be adapted to fit modular bookcases or bookcases joined together.

INSTALLING A RABBETED BASE MOLDING

1

Assembling the frame

The frame shown above is made from three pieces of molded stock, a back, and four ...

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