Category HORTICULTURE

PLANT CLASSIFICATION AND THE NATURAL WORLD

Although this text is not intended to replace a more thorough study of botany, the fullest appreciation of plants results from a basic under­standing of their place in the natural world. For centuries, beginning with a Greek named Theophrastus in about 300 b. c., scientists have attempted to classify the planet’s organisms into a tidy system that accommodates all current knowledge of the natural world and allows new knowledge to be added. As long as the new knowledge fit the cri­teria of the existing classification system, new knowledge was easily accepted. Thus, the organisms of the world were once classified into two kingdoms: plants and animals. If an organism moved, had a nervous system, and could not make its own food, it was classified as an animal...

>

HORTICULTURE

 

THE VALUE OF PLANTS IN OUR LIVES___________

Americans live within a culture of superlatives—the tallest building, fastest automobile, most populous city, costliest motion picture, and so on. Always seeking an event or superhero to top all others, we look farther and farther into space, probe deeper into the oceans, and con­trive an endless array of mechanical gadgetry. Yet within sight of us all at nearly all times are marvels of nature whose simple existence allows our survival and whose wonders are taken for granted although only partially understood.

Green plants produce and recycle the oxygen on which animal life depends. They capture the energy of the sun and convert it into forms usable by humans and other animals...

>

A BRIEF HISTORY OF ORNAMENTAF HORTICUFTURE

It is easier to define and distinguish the crops and crafts of orna­mental horticulture from the rest of horticulture than to separate the historical antecedents of ornamental horticulture from those of pomology, forestry, and vegetable production. Several factors account for the difficulty of assigning specific dates to the horticultural time line for ornamentals. Foremost among these factors is the chang­ing way people have used and regarded many of the plants of horticul­ture over time. Today’s flowering specimen trees were commonly more prized for their fruit in centuries past. Even their importance as food suffered inconsistencies. For example, peaches were once as important for hog feed as for peach brandy...

>

EXTENSIVE TEACHING/LEARNING PACKAGE Instructor’s Guide

The Instructor’s Guides provides answers to the end-of-chapter review questions.

ClassMaster CD-ROM

The ClassMaster CD-ROM provides the instructor with valuable resourc­es to simplify the implementation of the instructional program. It includes over 350 instructor slides in PowerPoint® focusing on each chapter’s key points to facilitate classroom presentations. In addition, a Computerized Test Bank of over 900 questions in multiple choice, true/ false, completion, and short answer format, as well as the accompany­ing answers, organized by chapter that can be used to generate tests and quizzes. Delivered via the ExamView Pro test generator platform, instructors can use the questions as provided or modify and add ques­tions as needed to generate tests that meet their specific needs...

>

STRUCTURE OF THE TEXT

The structure of Ornamental Horticulture: Science, Operations, & Management, 4th Edition, is designed to support and enhance the learning process. Each chapter opens with clearly stated learning objec­tives. These objectives are accomplished by means of the well-orga­nized text material and the most extensive collection of photographs and drawings of any textbook written on this subject. Student mastery of the learning objectives is measured at the end of each chapter in the achievement review. The answers to the achievement reviews are pro­vided in an Instructor’s Guide. Wherever possible, the information has been summarized in tables for ready reference. All terms are defined on first use in the text and again in a comprehensive glossary at the end of the text...

>

SCOPE OF THE TEXT

Unlike other texts that emphasize one aspect of the subject more than others, this text offers a balanced study of ornamental horticulture as an applied science, a craft, a profession, and a business. Section One con­sists of six chapters devoted to the science of ornamental horticulture. Plant structure and the mechanisms by which plants survive (photo­synthesis, respiration, and transpiration) are described. This informa­tion is essential to an understanding of how the manipulation of the environment will affect plant growth and response. The role of soil (both natural and that made by horticulturists) in plant growth and nutrition is

thoroughly explained. The basic binomial plant classification system is described...

>

HORTICULTURE

rnamental horticulture is a multifaceted industry which offers challenging employment opportunities. Those who have a basic understanding of plant science, its applications to practical growing situations, the crafts of horticulture, and business practices as applied in horticulture will find themselves better prepared to accept the challenges of the industry.

Ornamental Horticulture: Science, Operations, & Management, 4th Edition, was written because the author saw an educational need not being served by texts previously available to students. The texts either presented the science of horticulture at too high a level and in too much depth, or provided merely an overview of the industry techniques with­out giving the necessary scientific basis of those techniques...

>