Category Illustrated History Of Furniture

The Middle Ages

Period of 1000 years from Fall of Rome, A. D. 476, to Capture of Constantinople, 1453—the Crusades—Influence of Christianity—Chairs of St. Peter and Maximian at Rome, Ravenna and Venice—Edict of Leo III. prohibiting Image worship—the Rise of Venice—Charlemagne and his successors—the Chair of Dagobert—Byzantine character of Furniture—Norwegian carving—Russian and Scandinavian—the Anglo – Saxons—Sir Walter Scott quoted—Descriptions of Anglo-Saxon Houses and Customs—Art in Flemish Cities—Gothic Architecture—the Coronation Chair at Westminster Abbey—Penshurst—French Furniture in the 14th Century—Description of rooms—the South Kensington Museum—Transition from Gothic to Renaissance— German carved work: the Credence, the Buffet, and Dressoir.

The Middle Ageshe histor...

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Roman Furniture

As we are accustomed to look to Greek Art of the time of Pericles for purity of style and perfection of taste, so do we naturally expect the gradual demoralisation of art in its transfer to the great Roman Empire. From that little village on the Palatine Hill, founded some 750 years B. C., Rome had spread and conquered in every direction, until in the time of Augustus she was mistress of the whole civilised world, herself the centre of wealth, civilisation, luxury, and power. Antioch in the East and Alexandria in the South ranked next to her as great cities of the world.

From the excavations of Herculaneum and Pompeii we have learned enough to conceive some general idea of the social life of a wealthy Roman in the time of Rome’s prosperity...

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Greek Furniture

An early reference to Greek furniture is made by Homer, who describes coverlids of dyed wool, tapestries, carpets, and other accessories, which must therefore have formed part of the contents of a great man’s residence centuries before the period which we recognise as the "meridian" of Greek art.

In the second Vase-room of the British Museum the painting on one of these vases represents two persons sitting on a couch, upon which is a cushion of rich material, while for the comfort of the sitters there is a footstool, probably of ivory. On the opposite leaf there is an illustration of a has relief in stone, "Bacchus received as a guest by Icarus," in which the couch has turned legs and the feet are ornamented with carved leaf work.

Greek Furniture

We know, too, from other illustrations of tripods u...

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Egyptian Furniture

Подпись: Stool. Подпись: Stand tor S, Vase. Plead Refit or Pillow Подпись: Workman's Stool, Vase on a Stand.

In the consideration of ancient Egyptian furniture we find valuable assistance in the examples carefully preserved to us, and accessible to everyone, in the British Museum, and one or two of these deserve passing notice.

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Nothing can be more suitable for its purpose then the "Workman’s Stool:" the seat is precisely like that of a modern kitchen chair (all wood), slightly concaved to promote the sitter’s comfort, and supported by three legs curving outwards. This is simple, convenient, and admirably adapted for long service...

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Ancient Furniture

Biblical References: Solomon’s House and Temple—Palace of Ahashuerus, Assyrian Furniture: Nimrod’s Palace—Mr, George Smith quoted, Egyptian Furniture: Specimens in the British Museum—the Workman’s Stool—various articles of Domestic Furniture—Dr, Birch quoted, Greek Furniture: The Bas Reliefs in the British Museum—the Chest of Cypselus—Laws and Customs of the Greeks—House of Alcibiades—Plutarch quoted, Roman Furniture: Position of Rome—the Roman House—Cicero’s Table—Thyine Wood—Customs of wealthy Romans—Downfall of the Empire,

Подпись:he first reference to woodwork is to be found in the Book of Genesis, in the instructions given to Noah to make an Ark of1 gopher wood, "to make a window," to "pitch it within and without with pitch," and to observe definite measurements...

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Contents

Chapter I.

Biblical References: Solomon’s House and Temple—Palace of Ahashuerus. Assyrian Furniture: Nimrod’s Palace—Mr. George Smith quoted. Egyptian Furniture: Specimens in the British Museum—The Workman’s Stool—Various articles of Domestic Furniture—Dr. Birch quoted. Greek Furniture: The Bas Reliefs in the British Museum— The Chest of Cypselus—Laws and Customs of the Greeks—House of Alcibiades—Plutarch quoted. Roman Furniture: Position of Rome— The Roman House—Cicero’s Table—-Thyme Wood—Customs of wealthy Romans—Downfall of the Empire.

Chapter ii.

Period of 1000 years from Fall of Rome, A. D. 476, to Capture of Constantinople, 1453—The Crusades—Influence of Christianity— Chairs of St. Peter and Maximian at Rome, Ravenna and Venice— Edict of Leo III...

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Illustrated History Of Furniture

Illustrated History Of Furnituren the following pages the Author has placed before the reader an account of the changes in the design of Decorative Furniture and Woodwork, from the earliest period of which we have any reliable or certain record until the present time.

A careful selection of illustrations has been made from examples of established authenticity, the majority of which are to be seen, either in the Museums to which reference is made, or by permission of the owners; and the representations of the different "interiors" will convey an idea of the character and disposition of the furniture of the periods to which they refer...

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