Category SHOP-MADE JIGS AND FIXTURES

TWO CENTERING JIGS

A FACEPLATE-CENTERING JIG

TWO CENTERING JIGS

Centering the faceplate on a workpiece

To center your lathe’s faceplate on a cir­cular workpiece, use the handy jig shown at right. Turn a cylindrical piece of wood to the diameter of the faceplate’s threaded hole, tapering the end slightly. (You may wish to form a handle at the top end of the jig.) Drive a nail into the center of the tapered end, cut off the nailhead, and grind a sharp point. To use the jig, mark the center of the workpiece with an awl (page 132). Next, set the faceplate on the workpiece with the awl mark in the mid­dle of the threaded hole, insert the jig in the hole as shown, and “feel” for the mark with the nail tip. Holding the jig in place, screw the faceplate to the workpiece.

A CENTER-FINDING JIG

Acrylic plastic disk

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TURNING JIGS

Подпись:TURNING JIGSПодпись:Подпись:TURNING JIGS

Lathes enable a woodworker to turn blocks of wood of almost any irreg­ular shape into beautiful, rounded cre­ations. Woodturners often speak of how visual their art is; they see a chair leg, bowl, or pepper mill seem to grow from a spinning blank. Yet despite its visual element and the emphasis on “feel” for judging the progress of a turned work­piece, turning also depends on accuracy and careful measurement.

The jigs in this chapter will help you turn a workpiece with precision. Use one of the setup jigs shown on pages 70 and 71 to mount a blank properly on the lathe, even if the workpiece is irregular­ly shaped...

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. BORING DEEP HOLES

. BORING DEEP HOLES
5H0PTIP

Cutting rosettes on the drill press

You can cut decorative rosettes by modifying a drill press fly cutter with a beading blade from a table saw molding head.

Подпись:. BORING DEEP HOLESNotch the fly cutter arm to accommodate the bead­ing blade, locating the cut­ter about 1 inch from the end of the arm. Make sure it fits securely in the notch so it cannot shift during use. Bore a hole through the arm and use a bolt, washer, and nut to fasten the blade in the notch with its flat face toward the direction of cutter rotation. Set your workpiece on a wood base with stop blocks to hold it securely. Clamp the setup to the drill press table, aligning the center of the fly cutter over the center of the stock. Turn on the drill and lower the quill until the blade lightly contacts the wood...

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POCKET HOLE JIG

POCKET HOLE JIG

1 Making the jig

To bore pocket holes on the drill press, use this jig made from %-inch plywood and two small pieces of solid stock. Refer to the illustration at left for suggested dimensions. Screw the two sides of the cradle together to form an L. Then cut a 90° angle wedge from each support bracket so that the wide side of the cradle will sit at an angle of about 20° from the vertical. Screw the brackets to the jig base and attach the cradle to the brackets.

POCKET HOLE JIG

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Drilling pocket holes

Seat the workpiece in the cradle with the side to be drilled facing out and the top edge sitting in the V of the cradle...

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V-BLOCK JIG

V-BLOCK JIG

V-BLOCK JIGПодпись: SHOP TIPПодпись: Depth guides for drilling To bore a hole to an exact depth, use a masking tape flag or a depth stop block. If you are using the tape, measure the drilling depth from the tip of the bit, then wrap a strip of tape around its shank. Withdrawthe bit when the tape touches the stock. To use a block, sub- tractthe drilling depth from the length of the bit protruding from the chuck. Cut a piece of 1-by-1 stock to this length, then bore a hole through its middle. Slip the bit through the block and bore your hole until the block touches the workpiece. V-BLOCK JIG

Boring holes in cylindrical stock

To make the simple V-block jig shown above, mark a right-angle V on the end of a piece of solid stock that is long enough to hold your workpiece. Then, adjust the blade angle on your table saw to 45° and align one cutting line with the blade. Butt the rip fence against the stock and feed the board to cut the first side of the V. Reverse the piece and make the second cut. To use the jig, secure it to the drill table so the drill bit touches the center of the V when the quill is extended. Hold the workpiece in the V, aligning the bit over the cutting mark, set the drilling depth, and bore the hole (above).

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JIG FOR DRILLING EQUALLY SPACED HOLES

JIG FOR DRILLING EQUALLY SPACED HOLES
Подпись:JIG FOR DRILLING EQUALLY SPACED HOLESJIG FOR DRILLING EQUALLY SPACED HOLES

JIG FOR DRILLING EQUALLY SPACED HOLES

5H0PTIP

Making wood plugs

Save time making wood plugs by using a piece of tape to remove them from their holes. Use a plug cutter on the drill press to bore a row of plugs to the depth you require. Cover the row with a strip of masking tape, then rip the plugs to length on the band saw and simply peel off the tape to remove the row of plugs.

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Boring the holes

Set the jig on the drill press table. Mark the location of the first two holes and seat the workpiece against the fence of the jig, aligning the first drilling mark under the bit. Butt a guide block against the back of the jig and clamp it to the table. Bore the first hole, slide the jig along the guide block, and bore a hole through the dowel holder...

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TILTING TABLE JIG

TILTING TABLE JIG1 Making the table

To bore angled holes without tilting the drill press table, use the tilting jig shown at right, built from solid stock and %-inch plywood. Refer to the illustration for suggested dimensions. Connect the jig top to the base using a sturdy piano hinge. Cut a ^-inch-wide slot in the sup­port brackets and screw each one to the top; secure the brackets to the base with wing nuts, washers, and hanger bolts.

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Drilling angled holes

Center the jig under the drill press spindle, clamp the base to the table, and loosen the wing nuts. Use a pro­tractor and a sliding bevel to set the angle of the top, then tighten the wing nuts. Clamp the workpiece to the jig and bore the hole (below).

TILTING TABLE JIG

TILTING TABLE JIG

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DRILLING JIGS

 

Drilling a hole is simple, but there are times when a jig can save you time and frustration, especially when the hole must be located precisely, or at an exact angle. The center-drilling jig, for example, ensures that dowel joint holes will be centered in the edges of mating workpieces. The jig for drilling equally spaced holes on the drill press virtually eliminates the need for meas­uring and marking and guarantees con­sistently accurate results.

The tilting table and pocket hole jigs are both invaluable for boring the angled holes that are commonly used to attach tabletops and chair seats to legs and rads...

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TWO TENONING JIGS

A SIMPLE TENONING JIG

1 Building the jig

TWO TENONING JIGSTWO TENONING JIGS

Подпись: 2 Cutting a mortise Place the jig astride the fence. Butt the workpiece against the jig guide and clamp it in place. Position the fence to align the cutting marks on the board with the blade and slide the jig along the fence to make the cut (left).

Easy to assemble, the fence-straddling jig shown at right works well for cutting two-shouldered open mortise-and-tenon joints. Refer to the dimensions suggested in the illustration, making sure the thick­ness of the spacer and width of the brace allow the jig to slide smoothly along your rip fence without wobbling. Cut the body and brace from Winch plywood and the guide and spacer from solid wood. Saw an oval hole for a handle in one corner of the jig body and attach the guide to the body directly in front of the handle hole, making sure that the guide is perfectly vertical. (The blade may notch the bottom of the guide the first time you use the jig...

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COVE-CUTTING JIG

COVE-CUTTING JIG1 Building and using the jig

COVE-CUTTING JIG

Fashion molding on the table saw with the help of the cove-cutting guide shown at left. To construct the jig, fasten two 18- inch-long l-by-2s to two 9-inch-long 1-by – 2s with carriage bolts and wing nuts, forming two sets of parallel arms. Adjust the jig so the distance between the inside edges of the two long arms equals the width of the cove. Crank the blade to the desired depth of cut. Lay the guide across the blade and rotate it until the blade, turned by hand, just touches the inside edges of the arms. Then run a pencil along the inside edges of the long arms to trace guidelines across the table insert (left).

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Cutting a cove

Remove the guide and lower the blade beneath the table...

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