Category SHOP-MADE JIGS AND FIXTURES

CUTTING JIGS

 

From the time you cut rough lumber to length at the start of a project or miter trim to finish it, your power saws and handsaws are likely to be your most – used tools. Although many cutting tasks can be accomplished without them, the jigs shown in this chapter will make these operations easier—particularly when the same cut must be repeated on several workpieces.

With its intersecting arms, a table saw miter jig (page 50) guarantees miter joints that form perfect 90° angles. The tenoning jigs shown on pages 57 and 58 allow you to cut both parts of open mor – tise-and-tenon joints on the table saw.

Some jigs facilitate cutting tasks that are tough to perform freehand...

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VACUUM JIGS

Подпись: The heart of the vacuum system is the pump, here а Уз horsepower oil-less model, which draws air at a maximum of 4.5 cubic feet per minute. The hose features a quick coupler that attaches to a connector that is screwed into a hole through the template or featherboard. You will also need to use vacuum tape or closed-cell foam weatherstripping as a gasket to seal the cavity between template and workpiece or featherboard and work table. The vacuum system shown here is an excellent way to anchor feather- boards to work tables and fasten tem­plates to workpieces. The system is more convenient than conventional clamping and offers as much holding power with­out risking damage to stock. The only limitation is that mating surfaces must be flat and smooth.

To set up a vacuum system, you need the parts shown in the photo at left. The tape is fastened to the underside of the featherboard or template, creating a cav­ity. The hose from the pump is inserted in a hole in the featherboard or template. When the jig is placed on the surface, the pump sucks the air from the cavity, producing a vacuum. Any pump rated at 3 cubic feet per minute or higher is ade­quate for the home workshop...

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SHAPER JIGS

A CIRCLE-CUTTING JIG

 

SHAPER JIGSПодпись: Fence locking handle SHAPER JIGS1 Making the jig

Shaping circular work freehand on the shaper is a risky job. One way to make the task safer and more precise is to use a V – block jig like the one shown at left. Build it from a piece of %-inch plywood about 14 inches wide and 24 inches long. To customize the jig for your shaper, hold it above the table flush with the back edge and mark the location of the spindle on the surface. Cut a right-angle wedge out of the jig, locating the apex of the angle at your marked point. Then cut a circle out of the jig centered on the apex; the hole should be large enough to accommo­date the largest cutter you plan to use with the jig...

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JOINT-MAKING JIGS

JOINT-MAKING JIGS1 Building the jig

JOINT-MAKING JIGSThe jig shown at left allows you to rout slid­ing dovetails (inset) without a router table. Cut the fence, table, and support piece from [4] [5]/4-inch ply­wood. Make all the boards 16 inches long; the fence and table should be about 10 inches wide and the support piece about 3 inches wide. Screw the table to the table support so they form an L. Position the table 4 inches from the bottom of the fence and bore two holes through opposite ends of the fence into the table support. Use a router with a straight bit to lengthen the hole on the outfeed side of the fence into a curved slot. Attach the table support to the fence with carriage bolts, washers, and wing nuts...

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ADJUSTABLE ROUTING GUIDE

ADJUSTABLE ROUTING GUIDE1 Building the jig

ADJUSTABLE ROUTING GUIDE
ADJUSTABLE ROUTING GUIDE

Подпись: Routing the groove Outline the pattern on your stock and lay it on a work surface. Loosen the wing nuts of the jig and position it on the stock so the edge guides frame the outline. Place the router flat on the work-piece and align the bit with one edge of the outline. Butt one of the edge guides flush against the router base plate. Repeat on the other edges until all guides and templates are in position.
Подпись: (Use double-sided tape to secure the templates to the workpiece.) Tighten the wing nuts and clamp the jig and workpiece to the table. After plunging the bit into the stock, make the cut in a clockwise direction, keeping the base plate flush against the edge guide or template at all times. For repeat cuts, simply clamp the jig to the new workpiece and rout the pattern (above).

The jig shown at left is ideal for rout­ing grooves in a rectangular pattern; it can also be fitted with templates for curved cuts. Saw the guides from l-by-2 stock and rout a groove % inch deep and wide along the inside edge of each one. Cut a two-shouldered tenon at one end of each guide to fit in the grooves and bore a pilot hole into the middle of each tenon for a %-inch-diameter hanger bolt. Screw the bolts in place, leaving enough thread pro­truding to feed it through the adjacent edge guide with a washer and wing nut. Finally, rout %-inch-wide mortises through the guides; start about Ш inches from the end with the tenon and make the mortises 4 inches long, separating them with about H inch of wood...

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PANEL-RAISING JIG

PANEL-RAISING JIG1 Building the jig

Featuring a fence and tilting table, the jig shown at left enables you to raise pan­els using a router without mounting the tool in a table. The jig is clamped in a bench vise. Cut all the pieces of the jig from %-inch plywood; the dimensions suggest­ed in the illustration will work well with a typical workbench. Start assembling the jig by screwing the brackets to the underside of the table at one end, then cut adjust­ment slots through the arms. Secure the top ends of the arms to the brackets and the bottom ends to the fence using hanger bolts, washers, and wing nuts. Attach the table to the fence with a piano hinge posi­tioned about 6 inches below the top of the fence...

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CORNER-ROUNDING JIG

Подпись:CORNER-ROUNDING JIG1 Constructing the jig

For curving the corners of a workpiece, you can use the simple corner-rounding jig shown at right. The jig consists of a plywood base and two lips that align the edges of the jig and the workpiece. Cut the base from %-inch plywood. For most jobs, a base about 10 inches wide and 16 inches long will be adequate. Draw the curve you wish to rout on one corner of the base and cut it with a band saw or a saber saw; sand the edge smooth. Cut the lips from solid stock Уг inch thick and IV2 inches wide, then nail or screw the pieces to the base, leaving about 3 to 4 inches between each lip and the rounded corner. The top edge of the lips should be flush with the top surface of the base. [3]

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HINGE MORTISING JIG

HINGE MORTISING JIG1 Building the jig

A jig like the one shown at left will allow your router to cut hinge mortises quickly and accurately. To make the cuts, you will need to equip your router with a straight bit and a template guide. Build the template from a piece of [1] [2]/4-inch ply­wood. Size it wide enough to support the router. Outline the hinge leaf on the tem­plate; remember to compensate for the template guide and the thickness of the fence, which is also made from 3/4-inch plywood. Cut out the template, then attach the fence with countersunk screws.

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ROUTER JOINTING JIG

ROUTER JOINTING JIG

ROUTER JOINTING

ROUTER JOINTING JIG

ROUTER JOINTING JIGSHOP TIP

An auxiliary sub­base for wide cuts

To make a cut that is wider than a particular router bit, you would normally make one pass, shift your edge guide and make a second pass. Or, you can use this auxiliary off-square sub-base.

Подпись:Cut a piece of Winch plywood into an S>-inch square. Remove the router’s sub-base and bore the screw holes and clearance hole for the bit through the auxiliary sub-base so the tool will be cen­tered on the jig. Next, cut Vie inch of wood from one edge of the sub-base, Ye inch from an adjacent edge, and Ya inch from a third edge. Mark the amounts you removed on each side. Screw the jig to the router and make a pass with the uncut end flush against the guide...

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CIRCLE-CUTTING JIGS

CIRCLE-CUTTING JIGSComprising two hardwood dowels and a center block, this adjustable jig allows your router to cut circles of virtually any diameter. The jig is assembled by slipping the dowels into the accessory holes in the router base plate, fixing the dowels to the block, and attaching the block to the center of the circle marked on the workpiece. With wood cleats holding the stock to a work surface, the router bit is aligned with the end of the cir­cle’s marked radius and the screws that clamp the dowels to the base plate are tightened. The circle can then be routed.

CIRCLE-CUTTING JIGS

COMPASS JIG

Making the jig and routing a circle

To cut larger circles than most commercial guides allow, use the compass jig shown at right. Make the device from Winch hardboard, sizing it to suit your router...

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