SIZING BOARD FOR CROSSCUTS

SIZING BOARD FOR CROSSCUTSSIZING BOARD FOR CROSSCUTS1 Building the jig

The jig shown at right makes it easy to crosscut several workpieces to the same length by hand. Its adjustable stop block can be positioned at varying distances from the kerf in the fence. Cut the base and fence from %-inch plywood to the dimensions suggested in the illustration. Use solid wood for the stop block and lip. Screw the lip to the underside of the base, taking care to align the edges of the two pieces. Saw the fence into two segments about 7 inches from one end and use a router fitted with a ‘Cinch bit to cut grooves through both pieces about 1 inch from their top edges; stop the grooves about 2 inches from the ends of each piece. Screw the two fence sections to the base, ensur­ing that the gap between the two pieces is wide enough to accommodate a saw blade. Saw a 90° kerf across the surface of the base in line with the kerf in the fence. To prepare the stop block, cut a 3- inch-long rabbet on one face and bore a clearance hole through its center for a 1C inch-long, Cinch-diameter carriage bolt. Fasten the block to the fence with the bolt, washer, and wing nut.

2

Making a crosscut

Butt the lip against the edge of your workbench, loosen the wing nut, and slide the stop block along the fence to the proper distance from the kerf between the two fence sections. Tighten the wing nut and butt the end of the workpiece against the stop block. Hold the stock firmly against the fence as you saw (right).