Category WINDSOR FURNITURE

MAKING THE DOORS

An escutcheon is fastened to one of the doors of the bookcase shown at left. On this piece, the key and escutcheons are purely decorative. The doors are actually held shut by spring-loaded catches installed on the inside faces of the stiles near the bottom of the doors.

 

MAKING THE DOORSMAKING THE DOORSMAKING THE DOORS

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Cutting the tenon in the rails

Start making the frame-and-panel doors of the bookcase by cutting blind tenons at the ends of all the rails. To do the job on your table saw, install a dado head slightly wider than the tenon length. Attach an auxiliary wood fence and notch it by raising the dado head into it. Set the width of cut equal to the tenon length and adjust the cutting height to about one-third the thickness of the stock...

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. MAKING THE BOOKCASE

PREPARING THE SIDE PANELS FOR ADJUSTABLE SHELVING

5 top collar.

 

Bushing

 

Bushing

carrier

 

Shelf-drilling jig

 

Drilling holes for shelf supports

Cut the side panels of the bookcase to width and length, then set them inside-face up on a work surface. The commer­cial jig shown above enables you to bore two parallel rows of holes in the side panels at 1-inch intervals and ensures that cor­responding holes will be perfectly aligned. Clamp the jig to the edges of one panel; the holes can be any distance from the pan­el edges, but about 2 inches in would be best for the secretary. Fit an electric drill with a bit the same diameter as the sleeves
and install a stop collar to mark the drilling depth equal to the sleeve length...

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MAKING THE FALL-FRONT

MAKING THE FALL-FRONTOnce the frame for the fall-front has been assembled and hinged to the desk unit, the leather top can be glued to the inside face. The leather should be cut slightly larger than the recess. Use contact cement, hide glue, or thick wallpaper paste to attach the material to the surface. Trim it to size with a craft knife, then smooth it down with a hand roller, as shown at left. The leather should be treated with glycer­ine saddle soap once a year.

PREPARING THE FRAME

 

Weatherboard

 

Fall-front frame stock

Shaping the frame edges

Cut the four frame pieces for the fall-front from a single board. But before making these cuts, shape one edge of the board...

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BUILDING THE PIGEONHOLE UNIT

The pigeonhole unit is made to fit between the tops of the desk and drawer sections of the secretary. Molding can be tacked in place to hide the gap between the two carcases, as shown at left. You can also omit the molding, leaving the pigeonhole unit removable.

 

BUILDING THE PIGEONHOLE UNIT

MAKING THE UNIT

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BUILDING THE PIGEONHOLE UNIT Rough-cutting the arches

Referring to the anatomy illustration of the pigeonhole unit (page 108), out­line the shape of the arches on a piece of %-inch plywood, cut it out, and smooth the edges to fashion a template that you will use to make a routing jig (step 2). Before assembling the jig, use the tem­plate to outline six copies of the shape on your arch stock. Cut out the arches to within H inch of your cutting lines using the band saw...

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MAKING THE DRAWERS

The desk unit drawers are assembled with through dovetails, then a false front is glued to the drawer front to conceal the end grain of the tails. The chamfer cut around the perimeter of the false front shown above recalls the traditional practice of beveling the ends and edges of veneered drawer fronts, which pre­vented the veneer from being torn off when the drawer was opened and closed.

 

MAKING THE DRAWERS

GLUING UP THE DRAWERS

MAKING THE DRAWERSMAKING THE DRAWERS

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Routing the through dovetail joints

Size the drawer parts to fit their openings in the desk unit, then join the boards with dovetails, cutting the pins in the front and back of the drawer, and the tails in the sides...

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MAKING THE DESK UNIT

Подпись:The carcases of the desk unit and bookcase form the two main parts of the secretary. In keeping with the twin requirements of elegance and usefulness, both pieces are assembled with one of the most attractive—and sturdy—joints available to the woodworker: the half­blind dovetail. The steps shown below and on the following pages feature the connection between the top and sides of the desk unit; but the same proce­dures apply to the joints at the bottom of the both the desk and bookcase units.

Once the dovetails have been cut, you can move on to making the dust frames (page 112) and the loper housings. The carcase is then assembled (page 113) and the back panel is nailed in place (page 115). The final step, once the glue has cured, is installing the lopers.

CUTTING HALF-BLIND DOVETAILS

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ANATOMY OF A QUEEN ANNE SECRETARY

Top

Joined to sides with half-blind dovetails

Top of drawer section

Front edge is hinged to fall-front; ends fit into groove in carcase sides

Dust frame (page 112)

Supports drawer. Assembled with plate joints; side pieces fit into grooves in carcase sides

Подпись:Подпись:Loper (page 115)

Supports fall-front when in down position. Dowel glued into inside face slides in slot in loper housing; piece joined to front end with sliding dovetail conceals end grain

Loper housing

Features slot that guides loper; top edge fits into groove in under­side of drawer section top

Подпись: Layered base molding Подпись: bracket feet Glued to molding Подпись: 3 ottom Joined to sides with half-blind dovetails Подпись: Fall-front (page 122) Hinged to top of drawer section; serves as writing surface in down position. Outside face is veneered; inside face features leather inlay

Подпись:Подпись:

Подпись: Drawer bottom Fits into grooves in ■— front, back, and sides

ANATOMY OF A QUEEN ANNE SECRETARYLeather inlay-……


T

he major components of the Queen Anne secretary are shown in explod­ed form in this section...

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QUEEN ANNE SECRETARY

QUEEN ANNE SECRETARYПодпись: The weight of the fall-front in the secretary shown above is borne by a pair of supports called lopers. In the down position, the front becomes a leather-lined writing surface. The removable pigeonhole unit is set atop the desk unit.

The secretary, a bookcase and slant-top desk combination, evolved in Britain and America in the 18th Century and has been pop­ular ever since. By setting a book­case atop a slant-top desk, the secretary embodies the close rela­tionship between books and writ­ing. Until the 19th Century, books were an expensive and sometimes rare commodity to be treasured.

A secretary offered an ideal way to keep a precious collection safely behind glass, only an arm’s reach away. The Queen Anne version fea­tured in this chapter is more elegant than the stolid furniture that hall­marked the 17th Century, but it is less ornate than some of the incar­nations that followed it, such as Chippendale-style secretaries.

The desk half of the piece has several useful features...

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A MILK PAINT FINISH

Подпись: A milk paint finish is being brushed onto a sack-back Windsor chair. The transparency of milk paint, compared to other paints, along with its tendency to vary slightly in hue across a surface, complements the hand- sculpted contours of the Windsor chair. The dark green shown at right is a traditional color for Windsors.A MILK PAINT FINISH

The traditional finish for Windsor chairs is milk paint, which is thin enough to allow wood grain to show through. You can buy the paint in pow­dered form and mix it with water or make your own by following the recipe presented below. The blend provided was used in colonial times as an interi­or wall paint, which yielded a flat, lus­terless finish that can be stained, oiled, or waxed once the surface is dry. To pro­duce a semigloss sheen, egg whites can be added to the recipe. Their use has a long tradition in painting; egg tempera paints were used by some of the great Renaissance masters.

The ability of milk paint to produce a finish that is both durable and mois­ture-resistant is somewhat of a mystery, but it is known that a chemical reaction
occurs between the lactic acid in the mi...

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ASSEMBLING THE CHAIR

ASSEMBLING THE CHAIRПодпись: GLUING THE LEGS AND STRETCHERS TO THE SEATASSEMBLING THE CHAIRПодпись: 1 Drilling the stretcher mortises in the legs With the chair test-assembled, position the side stretchers on the legs and mark their locations. Then remove the legs from the seat and secure one in a vise. Because the legs are raked to the front and back of the chair, the stretcher mortises in the legs must be angled. Adjust a sliding bevel to the correct angle, referring to the anatomy illustration on page 73. For the front legs the angle is 15° from the vertical; for the rear legs, it is 20°. Install a spoon bit in a hand brace, set the sliding bevel on the benchtop, and keep the brace aligned with the bevel blade as you drill each mortise (above).

Once the stretchers have been glued to the legs and the legs fixed to the seat, it is time to trim the legs to the same length. The technique shown above involves cutting four wood blocks from a single board, then notching one of them to fit around a leg. Place the block around the first leg to be cut, then, holding the leg firmly with one hand, cut it to length with a flush-cutting saw. Once the first leg is trimmed, remove the notched block and replace it with one of the remaining blocks. Position the notched piece around the next leg and cut it. Continue in the same way until all four legs are cut.

Although the stretchers are glued to the legs and the legs are glued to the seat in separate steps, these procedures must be completed in quick succession for the chair to be symmetrical and...

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