Category SHOP-MADE JIGS AND FIXTURES

WORKSHOP HELPERS

A PLYWOOD CARRIER

 

WORKSHOP HELPERSПодпись: Runner

Подпись: PLANING SHORT AND THIN STOCK
Подпись: Using runner guides to plane short stock Feeding short boards through a thickness planer can cause sniping and kickback. To hold short stock steady as it enters and exits the planer, glue two solid wood scrap runners to the edges of your workpiece. Make sure the runners are the same thickness as the workpiece and extend several inches beyond both ends. Feed the workpiece into the planer (right), making a series of light cuts until you have reached the desired thickness. Then cut off the runners.

Moving large panels

Sheets of plywood, particleboard, and hard – board are often heavy and awkward to car­ry. The carrier shown at left will make the load easier to bear. Rout a 1-inch-wide rabbet along one edge of a 12-inch-long board. Cut a notch out of one end of a piece of plywood, then screw a wood block across the end of the notch to serve as a handle. Attach the other end of the ply­wood piece to the rabbeted face of the board (inset). To use the carrier, simply hook it under the sheet and pull it up under your arm (left). Some woodworkers find it more comfortable to stand on the carrier side of the panel and use their other hand to steady it.

Подпись: Triangular bracket WORKSHOP HELPERSWORKSHOP HELPERS

Подпись: Using a planing jig for thin stock Thickness planing stock thinner than lA inch often causes chatter and splintering of the workpiece. To avoid these problems make thin stock "thicker” with this jig. To make it, simply glue two beveled cleats to either end of a board that is slightly longer than your workpiece (inset). To make the cleats, cut a 45° bevel across the middle of a board approximately the same thickness as the workpiece. Next, bevel the ends of the workpiece. Set the stock on a backup board, position the cleats flush against the workpiece so the bevel cuts are in contact, and glue the cleats in place to the backup board. Run the jig and workpiece through the planer, making several light passes down to the desired thickness (right), then crosscut the ends of the workpiece square.
Подпись: AN AUXILIARY SWITCH FOR THE TABLE SAW

Installing an overhead switch

Switching on a table saw while balancing a lar...

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SAFETY DEVICES

PUSH STICKS AND PUSH BLOCKS

Making push sticks and push blocks

Push sticks and push blocks for feeding stock across the table of a stationary power tool can be made using %-inch plywood or solid stock. No one shape is ideal; a well – designed push stick should be comfortable to use and suitable for the machine and task at hand. For most cuts on a table saw, design a push stick with a 45° angle between the handle and the base (right, top). Reduce the handle angle for use with the radial arm saw. The notch on the bottom edge must be deep enough to sup­port the workpiece, but shallow enough not to contact the saw table. The long base of a rectangular push stick (right, middle) enables you to apply downward pressure on a workpiece...

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SHOP AIDS

 

Most jigs that hang from the walls of woodworkers’ shops typical­ly provide a shortcut to a common task, from boring mortises to edge-gluing panels. As the previous chapters have shown, the most popular jigs are those that make a job easier and more accu­rate, or improve a tool’s performance. But even the most mundane of work­shop chores can benefit from a helping hand, whether you are moving large sheet materials around a shop or throw­ing some light on your work.

This chapter covers a collection of such shop aids. Some devices, such as feath – erboards and push sticks (page 125), are indispensable for every woodworking shop...

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. LUMBER STORAGE RACKS

A VERTICAL PLYWOOD RACK

. LUMBER STORAGE RACKS

. LUMBER STORAGE RACKSConstructing the rack

For long-term storage, stacking plywood on end saves valu­able shop floor space. The rack shown at left is built from furring strips, threaded rods, and wing nuts. Start by screwing two l-by-3 furring strips to the studs of one wall, 2 and 5 feet from the floor; first bolt two threaded rods 41/ feet apart into the top strip. Cut a third furring strip and bore a hole through it at one end and saw a notch at the other end to line up with the rods. Both openings should be slightly larger than the diameter of the rods. Place two wood pads on the floor between the rods and stack the plywood sheets upright on them. Holding the third furring strip across the face of the last panel, slip one rod through the hole and the other into the slot...

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MOBILE CLAMP RACK

Подпись:Подпись:MOBILE CLAMP RACKПодпись: Median rail 1 Vz" x 3 Vz" x 23 Vz" Подпись:MOBILE CLAMP RACKПодпись:MOBILE CLAMP RACK1 Cutting the stock for the jig

The large collection of clamps in most shops—and their awkward size and shape—can stretch even the most organ­ized space to the limit. The mobile clamp rack shown at left can be stored against the wall, then rolled to any part of the shop where clamps are needed. Start by cut­ting the pieces to size, referring to the illustration for suggested dimensions. The six rails (top, median, and bottom) the two stiles, and three crosspieces are all sawn from 2-by-4 stock. Cut the four skirt pieces from a 2-by-4 and the base from VLinch plywood (inset).

MOBILE CLAMP RACKMOBILE CLAMP RACKMOBILE CLAMP RACKAttaching the rails to the stiles

Prepare the rails for the joinery by cutting end rabbets that will fit into notches and dadoes in the stiles...

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STORAGE DEVICES

Подпись:Подпись:STORAGE DEVICESПодпись:Подпись:STORAGE DEVICESWhether your workshop is tucked away in a corner of your base­ment or spread out over a two-car garage, storing the tools and materials that accumulate is a persistent challenge. This chapter offers several simple storage devices that can help you win the on­going battle against clutter. They will keep your tools and materials within easy reach when they are needed, and out of the way when they are not.

For storing hand tools, consider the handsaw holder (page 117) and the tool tray, the chisel, and router bit racks shown opposite. As well as helping to organize your tools, these devices will prevent damage to cutting edges.

An effective system for storing clamps is a must...

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ADJUSTABLE ROLLER STAND

ADJUSTABLE ROLLER STANDBuilding the stand

ADJUSTABLE ROLLER STAND
Set up on the outfeed side of a saw table, an adjustable roller stand like the one shown at left will help you support large workpieces. Start by constructing the frame for the roller, cutting the four pieces from l-by-4 stock. Glue the frame together with butt joints, adding screws to reinforce the connections. Then bore a hole in each side for a!/4-inch-diameter carriage bolt. Center the hole 3 inches from the bottom of the frame. Screw the roller to the top. Cut the remaining pieces of the stand from l-by-6 stock, referring to the dimensions provided, and rout a 14-inch-long, Vk-inch-wide slot down the middle of the two uprights. Screw the crosspiece to the uprights, aligning the top of the piece with the bot­tom of the slot. Fasten the upright and rails to the feet...

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VISE EXTENSION STAND

Making and using the stand

Подпись: NotchПодпись: Lag screwThe vise extension stand shown at right is used to support the free end of a long board clamped in the shoulder vise of a workbench. The dimensions given in the illustration will work well with most benches. Cut the upright to length, then saw angled notches at 2V2-inch intervals along its length, starting 5 inches from the bottom. Make the notch­es about 1 inch long and Уг inch wide. Then saw the feet to length and cut recesses along their bottom edges. Join the feet with an edge half-lap joint: Cut half-laps in the top edge of one foot and the bottom edge of the other, then glue the two together. Once the adhesive is dry, use a lag screw to attach the upright to the feet; drive the screw into the upright from underneath the feet...

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TABLES FOR POWER TOOLS

A ROUTER TABLE/CABINET

TABLES FOR POWER TOOLS1 Assembling the table

Built entirely from Winch plywood, the table shown at left allows you to use your router as a stationary tool—a require­ment of many operations. It features a large top with a slot for a miter gauge, an adjustable fence, a storage shelf, and cupboards. Start with the basic struc­ture of the table, sizing the bottom, sides, back, shelf, dividers, and doors to suit your needs. Fix these parts together, using the joinery method of your choice. The table shown is assembled with biscuit joints and screws. Bore a hole through the back panel to accommodate the switch’s power cord...

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PLATE JOINER STAND

PLATE JOINER STAND

Building the jig

Paired with a plate joiner, the jig shown above will reduce the setup time needed to cut slots for biscuits in a series of work­pieces. Build the jig from %-inch plywood, except for the barrel support, which should be solid wood. Refer to the illustration for suggested dimensions. Screw the handle support to the base and attach the handle brackets, spacing them to fit your tool. With the plate joiner resting upside-down on the handle support, butt the barrel support against the motor housing and outline its

shape on the stock. Bore a hole for the barrel and cut the sup­port in two across its width, through the center of the hole. Screw the bottom part to the base and fit the other half on top...

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