Design for Use

Usability 189

Simplicity Versus Clarity 193

accessibility 195

Meaning 198

187

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ne of the most important and seem­ingly simple design principles de­velopers can employ is to make sure that the things they design are usable. Not only does this increase the likelihood that your cus­tomers will prefer to buy your solutions, but it also increases the likelihood that, once they do, these solutions will actually be used, instead of discarded for something else that might work better. I’m sure you’ve been in this situation yourself, where you purchased something only to find out it didn’t fit your needs and you had to go find a substitute. Two or more solutions created to solve one problem is not a strategy for sustainability. Therefore, the more effective your solution is, for those for whom it is in­tended, the more likely that it will be used.

There are a few principles that fall into this category that can help focus designers and de­velopers on creating more successful solutions. For example, usability, clarity, accessibility, and meaning each contributes to more usable solutions that stand a better chance of being used over a longer period of time.

Two or more solutions created to solve one problem is not a strategy for sustainability.