Category Furniture of the eighteenth century

Conclusion

To summarize, the antecedents of Boston ЬотЫ furniture arose 011 the Continent, Stemming from Italian design sources, the bombe cascpiecc was transformed into contemporary usage by French cabi­netmakers, then adopted and reinterpreted by English taste, tradi­tion, and Craftsmanship before it was accepted in colonial America, In the manner peculiar to the arts, the bomb£ form cut across ideo­logical and political barriers to appear in both colonial and pOsl- Revolutionary Boston with virtually the same status...

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Makers

The makers of only four pieces of boston bombe furniture have been identified. Л desk and bookcase, signed by Benjamin Frothing ham and dated 1753, is the earliest documented example of the bombe form in Boston (fig. 97). An unusual bomb£ desk and bookcase widi paw feet and a squatty upper section is bbclled by James Mc – M і Ilian of Boston and was made sometime before 1769 (fig. 101). Another desk and bookcase is signed by Cicorge Bright, a cabinet­maker of Boston, and was constructed sometime between 1770 and 1792 (fig, 124). A chcst-on-chcst, signed by John Cogswell and dated 1782, is the latest documented example in Boston (fig. i2j).

An outstanding example of the bombe casepiece with curved drawer sides is the desk and bookcase made by George Bright for the Boston merchant Samuel ...

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CONSTRUCTION

Any study of Boston bombd furniture is dependent upon correct identification. Since few examples bear labels or other inscriptions identifying makers, a dose inspection of the inner construction and identification of the d і Accent woods is as necessary for the full under­standing of a piece of furniture as is the analysis of the exterior pro­portions and design.

Подпись:
Tile construction of American bombf furniture bears out the

CONSTRUCTION

116, Dfsius fo* A Commo»£ I’bess. From Thomas Chippendale, Tht Gnitknum and Cabinet Makers Штшот, plan: civ, London, 1754, (The Henry Francis du font Winterthur Museum Libraries. J

CONSTRUCTION

117, Commode, Made by John Cobb, London, 1771, Satin wood, hare wood, mahog­any, and ormolu; n...

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ORIGINS AND INFLUENCES

The sources oi American bombf furniture present a complex prob­lem. The first native manifestation of Bostonians’ taste for the curvi­linear baroque style is found in silver. With its easy transportability, inherent value, and strong dependence on Continental design, silver

4. Desmond Rlr-GcTald, Geetfran Furniture (London, 1969), fig. 11.

5. Chippendale ііїо imported French furniiure; Edward Joy in an anicle in Country Lift, ex (Avgitsi. 19Ji), j*j, draws intciuion то Chippendale’s шешрт io avoid ihe English customs.

145

was probably the vehicle for much of the importation of current Eng­lish taste in die seventeenth and eighteenth centuries...

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TEJtMJNOlGG

The word "bombe” is a recent term taken from the French verb bomber, meaning to bulge or jut our. The wrotd had been used to de­scribe both French and English furniture in the nineteenth century. The first publication to use the word to describe American furniture is Esdier Singleton’s Furniture of Our Forefathers (New York, lQOi), where it is italicized and an obvious French importation, Luke Viti-

TEJtMJNOlGG

56. СнеіТ-<Ж-Сн£!іт. Баиоп ігеа, с. 1740-1760. Mahogліу, thfiimui, jttd wlitie pine; Н, #7% inches, W. 4}’/7 inches, е>. 2г1/* inches, (YiJt University Art Gillery, Mibol Bddy Girvin Collection.)

TEJtMJNOlGG

97. Пи і к and Bookcase, Made by Benjamin Frorhinghim, md П. Sprig? (signature in pendt), В won or Charlestown, 1753...

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PERIOD OF POPULARITY

The appearance of the bombtf form in Boston poses a number of complex, unanswered, and perhaps unanswerable questions. What is the origin of the form that became so popular in Boston? How did

PERIOD OF POPULARITY

94. Tea Table. Boston ігєя, e. 1740-1770. Mahngmy and white pine; H, 17% indies, w. indies, n. aj indies. (Museum of Pine Arts, boston, M. sntl M. Karolik Collection, 41.441a.)

PERIOD OF POPULARITY

№. Си к st-on’-Chest. Made by Nathan Bower and Fbenexer Martin, Marblehead, !7&э. Mahogany and white pine; n_ tfointhes, w, 42, inches, d. 24’/a inches. (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Gift of Miss Josie E, Prescott at id Miss Mary F„ Prescott,

the design arrive in Boston? Why does the form appear only m Massachusetts, an atca resistant to the Counter-Reformation and its development of the baroque ae...

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The Bom be Furniture of Boston

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HE American bombtf cascpiecc is among the most ou[standing furniture forms produced by American eighteenth-century craftsmen. Bomb£ furniture is rare, well designed, and skill­fully constructed. More importantly for the historian, its produc­tion was almost exclusively confined to the city of Boston and its immediate environs.1 A study of this type of furniture will add tootir understanding of the period leading up to the American Revolution and the Federalist era in Boston and its cultural dependencies from Salem in the north to Plymouth in the south.

Appearing on chests of drawers, cbest-0n-chests, desks, desks and bookcases, dressing tables, dressing glasses, and tea caddies, the form as produced in Boston is defined by a single bulge located near the base of the front and sid...

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Boston В lock front Furniture

The ires arc undeniably forwarder in Massachusetts-Bay, thin either in Решу I vania or New York, The public buildings are more elegant; and there is a more general cum for music, painting, and the belles lettres,1

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HUS Andrew Burnaby, Vicar of Greenwich, England, de­scribed Boston in 1760, He was impressed by die gentle ele­gance and artistic temper of the inhabitants. Among these was a group of wealthy merchants whose impressive fortunes were often reflected in a fine domestic display. The home of such a merchant, obviously a composite of native craftsmanship and imported wares, is described by John Adams in 17661 “Dined at Mr. Nick Boyl – stoncs,… Went over die Ноше со view the Furniture, which alone cost a thousand Pounds sterling. A Scat it is for a noble Man, a Prince...

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Boston’s ColonialJapanners: The. Documentary Record

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OR decades, scholars have been looking with fascination at co­lonial japanned fumiLure made in Boston. They have lavished attention on these pieces, elegant or gaudy, according to your eye, and their writings have expressed a deep yearning to know who decorated them. As so often happens, history has not been co-opera­tive. No one, in the past, has been able to combine documentary evidence and decorative derail to form vocabularies of ornament and technique attributable to individual japanners...

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Boston Japanned Furniture

who advertised in The Button News-Letter of April 25 – May 2, 1715; “ Looki ng-G lasses of all sorts. Glass Sconces, Cabbinctts Esc г u to ires Chcsts4>f*Dnweis, Tables, Beaufetts, Writing Desks, Bookcases with Desks, old Glasses new Silvered, and all sons of Japan-work, Done and Sold by M rilllam Randle at the Sign of the Cabbinett, a Looking – Glass Shop in Queen-Street near the Town-House Boston.” The Adams high chest has much of its original raised w ork on the draw­ers hut contains some nineteenth-century overpain ring on the mold­ings and legs. The large, prominent figures are not unlike those on other William and Mary high chests (fig, 44) or the Queen Anne high chest (fig. 35) signed by Robert Davis, another Boston j ара liner.

The Davis high chest, the third documented e...

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