MASTER PLAN RENDERING: 1/3 ACRE (FIGURE 15-37)

Based on this house addition, which consisted of a large family room and a second- story master bedroom, two major spaces were developed to provide useable outdoor space. A major formal entertaining garden is located just outside both the living room

and the family room. The central part of this space is a large formal stone terrace. An ornamental stone wall fountain is centered between the two doors of the living room and on axis to the large fireplace. An angled checkerboard pattern of stone slabs and lawn provides a visual pattern for the garden. A stone path leads from this space, around a small formal garden sculpture, into the major lawn area for children’s play. An ornamental garden sculpture, in a small pool flanked by annuals and ornamental urns, makes for a major view from the gated pool area to the right. This color plate was prepared by The EDGE Group—Planning, Landscape Architecture & Graphic Design, Columbus, Ohio.

SUMMARY_____________________

Color rendering your landscape designs, in both plan and section, can be very beneficial in portraying design ideas to clients. The use of color will assist the client in differentiating between the design elements. Having completed this chapter, you should understand and/or be able to do the following.

• Identify, draw and use the 16 different line types in a variety of ways.

• Identify and demonstrate the 11 color pencil tech­niques in both plan and section.

• Render the following design elements in a variety of ways in both plan and section:

• Lawns and ground covers

• Deciduous plants

• Coniferous evergreen plants

• Tropical plants

• Paving materials

• Structures

• Water

• Specialty elements

• Know and demonstrate the differences in rendering (1) an already rendered black and white drawing, and (2) a basic plan (nonrendered black and white drawing).

• The differences in color rendering drawings during the various stages of design.

• The differences in color rendering drawings devel­oped at a variety of scales.

[1] Definition of outdoor space

• The three planes of spatial enclosure and the func­tions of each

• Landscape elements that define each of the three planes of spatial enclosure

• Outdoor rooms that are recommended for the resi­dential landscape

• Zones of the outdoor arrival and entry space and the location of each

• Recommendations for views and legal constraints along the street in front of the residence

• Guidelines for the driveway dimensions, safety for the opening of car doors, driveway edge, and the landing within the driveway space

• Considerations for making a pleasant walk to the front door including walk width and slope, direction of walk, enclosure, views, and use of focal points in the entry walk space

Tracy Chollak and Paul Rosenfeld, “Guidelines for Landscaping with Composted Amended Soil,” p. 22, prepared for Phil Cohen, City of Redmond Public Works.

[3]Victor Olgyay, Design with Climate: Bioclimatic Approach to Architectural Regionalism. (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1963), pp. 17—23.

[4]Anne Simon Moffat and Marc Schiler, Energy-Efficient and Environmental Landscaping (South Newfane, VT: Appropriate Solutions Press, 1994), p. 9.

[5]Dr. James R. Fazio, editor, “How Trees Can Save Energy,” Tree City USA Bulletin #21 (Nebraska City, NE: The National Arbor Day Foundation), p. 3.

[6]Anne Simon Moffat and Marc Schiler, Landscape Design That Saves Energy (New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1981), p. 18.

[7]Dr. James R. Fazio, editor, “How Trees Can Save Energy,” Tree City USA Bulletin #21 (Nebraska City, NE: The National Arbor Day Foundation), p. 3.

[8]Gary O. Robinette, Plants People Environmental Quality (Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Interior, 1972),

p. 78.

[9]Ibid., p. 79 and p. 82.

[10]Ibid., p. 82.

[11]Anne Simon Moffat and Marc Schiler, Energy-Efficient and Environmental Landscaping (South Newfane, VT: Appropriate Solutions Press, 1994), p. 75.

[12]http://www. worldclimate. com.

‘Outdoor Water Use in the United States,” EPA Water Sense, EPA-832-F-06-005.

[14]John Skow, “Can Lawns Be Justified?” Time (June 3, 1991), p. 63.

Ruth Chivers, “Alternative Lawns,” Garden Design (June/July 2006), p. 70.

[16]Maureen Gilmer, The Wildfire Survival Guide (Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company, 1995), p. 8

[17]Ibid., p. 58.

[18]Ibid., pp. 59-60.

[19]J. William Thompson and Kim Sorvig, Sustainable Landscape Construction (Washington, DC: Island Press, 2000), pp. 248-249.

[20] What a design process is and why it is critical to cre­ating design solutions for the residential site

• Six general phases of the design process

• Five steps of the research and preparation phase of the design process and what activities occur in each phase

• Three steps of the design phase of the design process and what activities occur in each phase

[21] Different methods to communicate information about the designer or firm to potential clients

• Information about the designer or firm that is typi­cally provided to potential clients

• General categories of information that are sought in the first meeting with clients

• Necessary facts about the family sought in the first meeting with clients

[22] Definition of a lot, plot plan, site plan, base map, and base sheet along with the information shown on each

• Three sources from which to obtain site data

• Visual clues that can suggest where the property lines might be located

• Three site measuring systems to determine distances and locations of site features

[23] Definition and purpose of preliminary design

• Process of creating, information shown, and graphic style of a preliminary design

[24] Definition and purpose of form composition in cre­ating a preliminary design

• Similarities and differences between form composi­tion and functional diagrams

• Critical components of the circle and how they should be used when integrating circles with other forms

• Critical components of the square and their use in creating two-dimensional compositions

• Guidelines for combining forms in a design

[25]One system for categorizing these functions was developed by Gary O. Robinette in his book, Plants, People, and Environmental Quality (Washington, D. C.: U. S. Department of Interior, National Park Service, 1972), p. 56.

[26] Rectangular (left side of Figure 14—22)

• Diagonal (right side of Figure 14—22)

• Arc and tangent (left side of Figure 14—23)

• Modified diagonal (right side of Figure 14—23)