Stone

A substantial and robust structure can be erected using locally occurring stone such as boulders or quarried rock. A low wall upon which the signboard is fixed, or a plinth, can be built either dry or mortared. Mortar will make the structure stronger, but pointing should be recessed out of sight, so good workmanship is essential. Boards can be secured by bolts set into the rock or mortar, and the whole structure is very robust. It is best used in mountainous areas where rock is the main material, where digging post holes is difficult or where strong winds may shift lighter structures.

Alternatively, a flat surface can be cut onto a large boulder or rock face, the panel being anchored directly onto this; or the message could be sandblasted directly onto an appropriate rock surface, this latter technique being very effective.

Stone

A stone structure used as the base for an information sign. Although used in a forest this might be more suitable in an open rocky landscape where stone is a dominant material. The workmanship of this example is good, but there is wear and tear around the unpaved sides of the structure. Glen Affric, Scotland.

Stone

(a) Round timber can be used to build a sturdy yet simple frame upon which to mount an information panel. Here two deep slots in the horizontal members hold the panel in place, the top section being removed to extract the panel. (b) A structure using sawn timber, where the panel slides into place through slots in the uprights. Hidden bolts secure it into place. This design was developed by Forest Enterprise in Britain, and is used widely with laminated panels.