STORAGE iN THE BATHROOM (FORM 4)

Talking about activities in the bathroom can easily lead to discussing your client’s storage needs. What does your client want to keep in the bathroom? Where will they use the different items stored in the bathroom? How frequently do they use each item? These are some examples of in­formation that is useful to you, the designer, in planning bathroom storage.

The users of the bathroom space can complete the storage inventory checklist in Form 4: Bathroom Storage Inventory. This inventory is divided into several sections, by location of storage: near the vanity/lavatory/grooming center; near the bathtub/shower; near the toilet/bidet; and other; as well as for display only. In addition, your client is asked to identify frequency of use and type of storage. The Form 4 checklist has many common bathroom items already listed to make it easier to use. This checklist will be very helpful in the design process, so encourage your client to be thorough in completing it. Also, it is helpful if the client has completed this inventory in advance of the in­terview.

You will want to compare Form 3: Checklist for Bathroom Activities with Form 4: Bathroom Storage Inventory. Are there supplies needed for an activity that are not included on the storage inventory? Do some of the storage items suggest activities that are not included on the checklist? You may need to go back to the client for clarification.

If you are going to design a clothes closet adjacent to, or integrated into, the bathroom, you may need more detail than is provided in the bathroom storage inventory. Form 11: Clothes Storage Inventory for Hanging Clothes, Form 12: Clothes Storage Inventory for Folded, Rolled, and Other Types of Clothes, and Form 13: Worksheet for Folded or Rolled Clothing are available to gather specific information for designing closets. If you will be incorporating an exercise area in or near the bathroom, you may want to use Form 1 5: Assessment for Exercise Area to help in planning the space. These forms are provided and discussed in chapter 9, "More Than a Bathroom," along with more information about planning closets and exercise areas.

Towels

Towels need special consideration when designing a bathroom. In addition to the storage inventory information on towels, you need to consider the regular users of the bathroom, their activities, and the size towels they use, to determine how many towel bars are needed. Do not forget to ask about special towel storage features, such as heated towel bars or towel warmers.

Your client may want a linen closet in, or adjacent to, the bathroom. Refer to chapter 9 for Form 14: Linen Closet Storage Inventory for more information on planning linen closets.

Form 4: Bathroom Storage Inventory

Instructions: This inventory is divided into sections representing areas in the bathroom. Many of the typical items found in bathrooms are already listed. Check those items you want to store in the bathroom. Add any additional items needed. Complete the form, indicating how many of each item you have, how frequently you use it, and the type of storage you would like. Blank lines are included for items you have that are not listed. A space for notes is at the end of each section. Include information about special size or space requirements, items that need to be stored away from children, or other important details.

Items Stored Near the Vanity/Lavatory/Grooming Center

Item to Store

How Many?

Frequency of use

Type of Storage

Often

Sometimes

Cabinet

Open Shelf

Drawer

(Other Describe)

Barrettes, pins, clips

Contact lens supplies

Curlers: electric

Curling iron

Hair brush, comb

Hair care products, e. g., mousse, gel

Hair dryer

First aid supplies

Glasses: drinking

Lotion

Make-up/cosmetics, e. g. mascara, lipstick

Medicines, vitamins

Nail clippers, files

Nail polish, manicure supplies

Perfume, cologne

Razor

Razor, electric

Shaving cream, after shave

Soap

Tissues

Toothbrush

Toothbrush, electric

Toothpaste, dental floss

Towels, face

Towels, hand

Tweezers

Additional vanity/lavatory/grooming items:

notes:

(continued)

Items Stored Near the Bathtub/Shower

Item to Store

How Many?

Frequency of use

Type of Storage

Often

Sometimes

Cabinet

Open Shelf

Drawer

(Other Describe)

Bubble bath

Cleaning supplies

Clothes: dirty

Clothes: robe, pajamas or sleeping clothes

Clothes: underwear

Douching equipment

Lotion

Powder

Radio, CD player

Razor

Scale

Shampoo, conditioner

Shower gel

Soap

Sponges

Squeegee

Television

Towels, bath

Towels, bath sheets

Towels, face or hand

Towels, guest

Toys

Additional bathtub/shower items:

Form 4: Bathroom Storage Inventory (continued)

items Stored Near the Toilet/Bidet

item to Store

How Many?

Frequency of use

Type of Storage

Often

Sometimes

Cabinet

Open Shelf

Drawer

(Other Describe)

Books

Diapers; clean

Diapers; soiled

Magazines, newspapers

Medicines

Sanitary napkins, tampons

Soap

Toilet bowl brush

Toilet bowl cleaners

Toilet paper

Towels

Wet wipes

Additional toilet/bidet items;

Other items to Store (if a separate linen or clothes closet is planned, additional information may be needed)

item to Store

How Many?

Frequency of use

Type of Storage

Often

Sometimes

Cabinet

Open Shelf

Drawer

(Other Describe)

Accessories, e. g,, scarves, belts

Clothes: folded clothes

Clothes: rod storage (specify height)

Clothes: rod storage (specify height)

Coffee maker

Coffee or tea supplies, e. g., cups, spoons

Exercise equipment

Household linens, miscellaneous

Household linens, pillows

Household linens, pillow cases

Household linens, sheets

Jewelry

Laundry products

Robe, pajamas, nightgown

Shoes, slippers

Additional items:

Notes:

Form 4: Bathroom Storage Inventory (continued)

items For Display

item to Store

How Many?

Frequency of Use

Type of Storage

Often

Sometimes

Cabinet

Open Shelf

Drawer

(Other Describe)

Antiques

Baskets

Bottles, jars, bowls

Decorative items, miscellaneous

Pictures, artwork

Plants

Additional display items:

YOUR CLIENT’S BATHROOM PREFERENCES (FORM 5)

After determining bathroom activities and storage requirements, you need to ask your client what they do and do not like in a bathroom—and what is feasible for their space and budget.

Begin with their current bathroom(s), even ones they are not planning to remodel (at this time). Ask what they do not like about the space. Be very specific. Let your client volunteer information first, such as:

• There is not enough light over the vanity.

• The space feels crowded.

• There are not enough towel bars.

Then ask what they do like, such as:

• The bathtub is comfortable for soaking.

• The towel racks are convenient to the shower.

Ideas suggested by your client, positive or negative, can indicate areas of strong feeling. Remember these as you develop your design.

Next, ask your client to talk about what they want in a bathroom. Let them suggest ideas, but be sure to cover the major features. Form 5: Your Client’s Bathroom Preferences can help you collect and organize this information.