Composite

Furnishings that utilize two or more geometric systems, such as curvilinear and orthogonal, or two or more distinct materials such as stone and wood in one piece are considered com­posite. The bent, welded, and chromed tubular steel frame in Marcel Breuer’s Model B32 (Figure 3.14) is distinct from its black leather seat pan and backrest. Nintendo Power is a display and storage unit organizing the media and hardware for Nintendo’s original 8-bit gaming system. The geometry is entirely orthogonal, but the design is a composite of vari­ous materials and components with iconic references (Figure 3.15). Isamu Noguchi’s coffee table is a composite of biomorphic-shaped wood supports and a curvilinear glass top (Figure 3.16). The shape of the glass top enables versatility for space-planning purposes.

Composite

Figure 3.15 Nintendo Power, designed and fabricated by Jim Postell (1990). Photography by Jim Postell, 1990.

 

Composite

Figure 3.16 Coffee table, designed by Isamu Noguchi for Herman Miller (1947). Made with a plate glass top and solid walnut base. 50 inches wide; 36 inches deep; 15% inches high (127 cm wide; 91.5 cm deep; 40 cm high). Photography by Phil Schaafsma. Courtesy of Herman Miller, Inc.

 

Composite

Figure 3.14 Model B32, designed by Marcel Breuer (1928). Photography by Jim Postell, 2005.