Focalization of Interest

In the application of this principle, a landscape designer either creates focal points for the landscape or enhances them where they already exist. Each major use area of a landscape should have one focal point. Only where the use areas are further subdivided (for example, a pool area within the larger family living area) should additional focal points be considered.

Some focal points are obvious. For example, in the public area the house entrance is the point to which the viewer’s eye should be directed (Figure 9-12). Examples of focal points commonly used in other areas are specimen plants, statuary, ponds or pools, birdbaths, and sundials.

Focalization of Interest

figure 9-12. Focalization: Plants are arranged in an asymmetrical manner to move the viewer’s eye toward the entrance, the focal point. (Delmar/Cengage Learning)