Category SHOP-MADE JIGS AND FIXTURES

AUXILIARY FENCES AND TABLES

AUXILIARY FENCES AND TABLES

A RADIAL ARM SAW MOLDING FIXTURE

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Cutting a molding

Install a molding head on your saw, then secure the workpiece by clamping one featherboard to the outfeed side of the fence and another to the table, braced with a support board. Adjust the molding head for a ^-inch-deep cut, making cer­tain the blade guard is positioned just above the workpiece. Feed the stock into the cutters with your right hand (right)-, use your left hand to press the workpiece against the fence. Finish the pass with a push stick. Make as many passes as nec­essary, advancing the molding head no more than % inch into the workpiece at a time. Once you have cut the desired profile, make a final, very shallow pass, feeding slowly and evenly to produce a smooth finish.

AUXILIARY FENCES AND TABLES

AUXILIARY FENCES AND TABLESПодпись: Using an auxiliary fence Anytime you use a dado or molding head on your table saw in conjunction with the rip fence, you need to attach a wood fence to prevent the blades from contacting the metal one. Cut the fence from %-inch plywood the same length as the rip fence and slightly higher. Lower the blades below the saw table and screw the wood fence to the rip fence. Mark the depth of cut on the fence and position the auxiliary fence directly over the dado head, ensuring that the metal fence is clear of the blade. Turn on the saw and slowly crank up the dado head to the marked line, producing a relief cut in the auxiliary fence. Butt the cutting line on the workpiece against the outer blade and lock the fence flush against the stock. For most cutting operations, like the rabbet cut shown in the illustration, the workpiece should be supported with featherboards. Feed the workpiece at a steady rate, using both hands (above).

Подпись: SHOP TIP
Подпись: A miter gauge extension To increase the bearing surface of your table saw’s miter gauge or to make repeat crosscuts with the aid of a stop block, attach a wood extension to the gauge. The extension must be long enough to extend beyond the saw blade. Screw it to the gauge and push the gauge to cut off the end of the extension. Turn off the saw and slide the miter gauge to the front of the table. To set up a stop block, clamp a wood block to the extension the desired distance from the blade. For each cut, butt the edge of the workpiece against the extension and the end against the stop block.

AN AUXILIARY FE...

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RAISED PANEL JIG

RAISED PANEL JIG

RAISED PANEL JIG1 Making the jig

To raise a panel on the table saw without adjusting the blade angle, use the shop-built jig shown at left. Refer to the Illustration for suggested dimensions. Screw the lip along the bottom edge of the angled fence, making sure to position the screws where they will not interfere with the blade. Prop the angled fence against the auxiliary fence at the same angle as the cutting line marked out on the panel to be raised. Use a sliding bevel to trans­fer this angle to triangular-shaped supports that will fit between the two fences and cut the supports to fit. Fix the supports in place with screws (above).

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RAISED PANEL JIG Raising a panel

Shift the rip fence to position the jig on the saw table with the joint of the lip and angled fence over the blade; ensure that the screws ...

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. CROSSCUT AND MITER JIGS

A CROSSCUT JIG FOR THE TABLE SAW

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. CROSSCUT AND MITER JIGS Attaching the runners to the base

A crosscut jig custom-made for your table saw like the one shown above is especially valuable if you are working with unwieldy stock. Refer to the illustra­tion for suggested dimensions. Start by cutting two 25-inch-long hardwood runners to fit your miter slots. Bore and countersink clearance holes for screws into the undersides of the runners, 3 inches from each end. Place the runners in the slots and slide them out to overhang the back end of the table by about 8 inches. Position the jig base squarely on the wood strips, its edge flush with their over­hanging ends, and screw the runners to the base (left). Slide the runners and the base off the front end of the table and drive in the other two screws.

. CROSSCUT AND MITER JIGS

. CROSSCUT AND MITER JIGS

Install...

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A BLADE HEIGHT GAUGE

SETTING THE BLADE HEIGHT ON A TABLE SAW

A BLADE HEIGHT GAUGEUsing a blade height gauge

Your table saw’s blade can be set at a specific height quickly with a blade height gauge. Make the jig from strips of Vs – or Me-іnch-thick hardboard or solid wood laminated together. First, rip a length of the stock to a width of 3 inches. Crosscut the piece into strips, starting with an 8- inch length. Make each successive strip % inch shorter than the previous one. Once all the strips are cut, glue them together face-to-face with one end aligned. To use the jig, set it on the saw table beside the blade and rotate the blade height adjustment crank until the blade contacts the gauge at the desired height (right).

SHOP TIP

Shop-made table inserts

If the table inserts supplied with your table saw are at least A inch thick, ...

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TWO JIGS FOR ANGLE CUTS ON THE BAND SAW

TAPER JIG

TWO JIGS FOR ANGLE CUTS ON THE BAND SAWMaking taper cuts

The simple L-shaped jig shown at right will enable you to cut tapers on the band saw. Mark the desired taper on the workpiece and place it on a board with a perfectly square edge, aligning the marked line with the board’s edge. Use the long edge and the end of the workpiece as a straightedge to mark an angled cutting line and the lip on the board. Saw along the cutting line, stopping 2 inches from the end of the cut at the bottom end of the board. Turn the board 90° to cut out the lip. To use the board as a jig, set up the band saw’s rip fence to the right of the blade and hold the jig flush against the fence. Align the edge of the jig’s lip with the saw blade and lock the fence in position. Seat the workpiece against the jig...

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WEDGE-MAKING JIG

WEDGE-MAKING JIG1 Building the jig

Small wedges are used for wedged tenons, or to shim cabinets on uneven floors. The jig shown at left allows you to make them quick­ly on the band saw. (You can also use the same device on a table saw.) Refer to the illustration for suggested dimensions, making sure the hardwood runner fits snugly in the saw table miter slot. Screw the runner to the underside of the base so that the runner ex­tends beyond the tabletop and the base sits squarely on the table when the runner is in the slot; countersink the fasteners. Next, screw the fence to the top of the base; angle the fence at about 4° to the front and back edges of the base. Set the jig on the table with the runner in the slot, turn on the saw, and cut through the base until the blade contacts the fence...

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TWO CIRCLE-CUTTING JIGS

CUTTING CIRCLES WITH THE SABER SAW

TWO CIRCLE-CUTTING JIGSПодпись: 2 Using the jig Clamp down the stock with as much of the workpiece as possible extending off the table, using wood pads to protect the stock. Cut into the stock to bring the blade up to the outline of the circle you will be cutting. Then drive a screw into the jig on the pivot line at the center of the circle. Holding the saw and the stock firmly, cut out the circle (below), shifting the clamps and workpiece as necessary. 1 Building the jig

TWO CIRCLE-CUTTING JIGS
To cut circles bigger than the capac­ity of commercial saber saw jigs, use a shop-made guide customized for your saw. The exact size of the jig can vary, but the dimensions suggested in the illustration at left will yield a jig large enough to cut a circle to the edges of a 4-by-8 panel. Begin by removing the blade from your saw and outlining its base plate on a piece of ^-inch plywood. Reinstall the blade and cut along the marks, making the section that will be beneath the base plate slightly larger than the plate. Lighten the jig by trimming it to the shape of an L, then cut out the notch for the blade. Screw the jig to the base plate, ensuring that the back of the blade is flush against the bottom of the notch...

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. RIPPING JIGS

Подпись: ShoulderПодпись:. RIPPING JIGSUsing a kerf splitter

. RIPPING JIGS

A kerf splitter like the one shown at left will help prevent a circular saw blade from binding in its kerf and kicking back. Choose /Gnch hardboard for the splitter piece and %-inch plywood for the shoul­ders; refer to the illustration for suggest­ed dimensions. Fasten the three pieces together with screws. To use the jig, start the cut, turn off the saw, and insert the splitter in the kerf a few inches behind the saw. Back up the saw slightly, then continue the operation (left). For partic­ularly long cuts, advance the kerf splitter periodically to keep it near the saw.

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MITER AND CROSSCUT GUIDE

1 Assembling the jig

MITER AND CROSSCUT GUIDEThe multipurpose edge guide shown at right will allow you to cut either 45° miter cuts or 90° crosscuts with a saber saw or a circular saw. Make the jig from a piece of %-inch plywood, referring to the illustration for suggested dimensions. Cut the base in the shape of a triangle with one 90° angle and two 45° angles. (To make a jig for 30° or 60° miter cuts, the sides should be 12, 16, and 20 inches or a variation of the 3-4-5 ratio.) Screw the fences to the base—one on each side— opposite one of the 45° angles. The fences must be flush with the edge of the jig base.

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Подпись: 0 і LH-P Подпись: — Making a miter cut

To cut a miter using the jig, set the stock on a work surface with the cutting line on the board extending off the table...

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SIZING BOARD FOR CROSSCUTS

SIZING BOARD FOR CROSSCUTSSIZING BOARD FOR CROSSCUTS1 Building the jig

The jig shown at right makes it easy to crosscut several workpieces to the same length by hand. Its adjustable stop block can be positioned at varying distances from the kerf in the fence. Cut the base and fence from %-inch plywood to the dimensions suggested in the illustration. Use solid wood for the stop block and lip. Screw the lip to the underside of the base, taking care to align the edges of the two pieces. Saw the fence into two segments about 7 inches from one end and use a router fitted with a ‘Cinch bit to cut grooves through both pieces about 1 inch from their top edges; stop the grooves about 2 inches from the ends of each piece. Screw the two fence sections to the base, ensur­ing that the gap between the two pieces is wide enough to accommodate a saw blade...

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